The Difference Between Broth and Stock Plus Easy Pressure Canning Recipes

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The Canning Diva home canned chicken broth to use in recipes

The Difference Between Broth and Stock

Broths and stocks are mainstays in our kitchens as they are the foundation, or building blocks, for so many recipes, especially when making soups and stews. Understanding their differences and similarities will help you decide which is best to use in a particular recipe and may also dictate what you decide to preserve versus purchase. While the term “stock” and “broth” are often used interchangeably, within the culinary world there is a distinct difference.

Stock

Stock is the key player in many classic cuisines and is the basis for which almost every sauce and stew is created. Stocks are rich in flavor and are used to enhance the natural juices of beef, chicken, pork and fish dishes. For instance, my Chicken Tortilla Soup recipe specifically calls for stock over broth. The depth and flavor profile of a stock is achieved by using roasted bones, mirepoix (onions, carrots and celery), aromatic vegetables and seasonings like garlic and fresh herbs.

What sets stock apart from broth is the roasting and lengthy simmering of bones from animals or fish. It is the marrow and collagen from bones that give stock its distinct flavor and a gel-like consistency. It is this body and depth that is transferred into every recipe where stock is used. And for the record, “bone broth” is actually stock.

Easy Chicken Stock Canning Recipe

Yield: Approx. 7 quarts or 14 pints

Ingredients

16 quarts water

4 to 6 pound chicken carcass, whole chicken or 6 large breasts with bone, skin and rib meat

4 yellow onions, peeled and halved, divided

10 whole garlic cloves

5 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped

4 celery stalks, coarsely chopped

2 bay leaves

1 bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley, or 2 tablespoons dried parsley flakes

4 sprigs oregano, or 1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon black peppercorns

Instructions

  1. In a 16- to 20-quart stock pot add water and chicken carcass, whole chicken or chicken breasts. Add onions, garlic, carrots, celery, bay leaves, parsley, oregano and peppercorns.
  2. Starting on medium heat, bring stock pot to a boil, stirring occasionally. Increase to medium-high heat and gently boil for 5 minutes. Reduce heat and simmer, undisturbed and uncovered, for 6 hours.
  3. Throughout simmering process, skim off foam and discard. Do not disturb the stock.
  4. Using a slotted spoon, remove carcass, meat, vegetables and herbs from stock pot. Meat may be used to make soup or stew, but discard bones, vegetables and herbs. Pour stock through a fine-mesh chinois strainer, or sieve, capturing strained stock in a large, clean stock pot.
  5. Ladle hot strained stock into hot jars leaving 1” head space. Wipe each rim with a warm wash cloth dipped in vinegar.  Place lid and rings on each jar and hand tighten. 
  6. Place jars in pressure canner, lock the pressure canner lid and bring to a boil on high heat.  Let canner vent for 10 minutes Close vent and continue heating to achieve 11 psi for a dial gauge and 10 psi for a weighted gauge. Process quarts for 25 minutes and pints for 20 minutes.

Ingredient Tip: Feel free to substitute a turkey carcass, especially if you have one in the freezer from a previous holiday meal.

Broth

Broth has a broader use in the home kitchen than stock as you will find it called for in the creation of many side dishes like rice or couscous, mashed potatoes, stuffing and when creating thinner-based soups. Broth usually replaces water when cooking. When creating broth although we use meat and bones, they are not roasted, just added raw to the stock pot and then simmered with fresh herbs, mirepoix and water for much less time than stock.

Chicken Broth Canning Recipe

Yield: Approx. 7 quarts or 14 pints

Ingredients

16 quarts water

1 whole chicken (2 to 4 pounds)

4 yellow onions, peeled and quartered

10 whole garlic cloves

1 bunch fresh thyme, or 1 tablespoon dried thyme

2 teaspoons coarse sea salt, halved (optional)

5 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped

4 celery stalks, coarsely chopped

2 bay leaves

1 bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley, or 2 tablespoons dried parsley flakes

4 sprigs oregano, or 1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon black peppercorns

Instructions

  1. In a 16- to 20-quart stock pot add water, chicken pieces, onions, garlic, thyme, salt, carrots, celery, bay leaves, parsley, oregano and peppercorns. Mix well to distribute ingredients.
  2. Starting on medium heat, bring stock pot to a boil. Increase to medium-high heat and gently boil for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat and simmer, undisturbed and uncovered, for 1 hour.
  3. Throughout simmering process, skim off foam and discard. Do not disturb the broth.
  4. Using a slotted spoon, remove meat, vegetables and herbs from stock pot. Meat may be used to make soup or stew, but discard bones, vegetables and herbs. Pour stock through a fine-mesh chinois strainer, or sieve, capturing strained stock in a large, clean stock pot.
  5. Ladle hot strained stock into hot jars leaving 1” head space. Wipe each rim with a warm wash cloth dipped in vinegar.  Place lid and rings on each jar and hand tighten. 
  6. Place jars in pressure canner, lock the pressure canner lid and bring to a boil on high heat.  Let canner vent for 10 minutes Close vent and continue heating to achieve 11 psi for a dial gauge and 10 psi for a weighted gauge. Process quarts for 25 minutes and pints for 20 minutes.

Ingredient Tip: While chicken is the most commonly used poultry, feel free to substitute a whole turkey, pheasant, or two male Cornish game hens. If in a pinch, you may also make chicken broth using 4 large breasts with rib meat. Keep the skin on regardless which bird you choose.

For more recipes, be sure to check out my latest cookbook, Beginner’s Guide to Canning; 90 Recipes to Can, Savor and Gift.

Happy Canning!
xx
Diane, The Canning Diva®

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